Airlift and Airborne Operations in World War II: U.S. Army Air Forces, DC-3, C-87, C-54, C-69, Helicopters, Gliders, Mediterranean, Frantic, Carpetbagger, Overlord, Market Garden, Flying the Hump Progressive Management

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Published: August 16th 2015

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Airlift and Airborne Operations in World War II: U.S. Army Air Forces, DC-3, C-87, C-54, C-69, Helicopters, Gliders, Mediterranean, Frantic, Carpetbagger, Overlord, Market Garden, Flying the Hump  by  Progressive Management

Airlift and Airborne Operations in World War II: U.S. Army Air Forces, DC-3, C-87, C-54, C-69, Helicopters, Gliders, Mediterranean, Frantic, Carpetbagger, Overlord, Market Garden, Flying the Hump by Progressive Management
August 16th 2015 | ebook | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | | ISBN: | 5.43 Mb

Professionally converted for accurate flowing-text e-book format reproduction, this military publication tells the story of airlift and airborne operations by the U.S. Army Air Corps in World War II. As World War II unfolded in Europe during the lateMoreProfessionally converted for accurate flowing-text e-book format reproduction, this military publication tells the story of airlift and airborne operations by the U.S.

Army Air Corps in World War II. As World War II unfolded in Europe during the late 1930s and early 1940s, U.S. military planners realized the nations airlift and airborne combat capability was underdeveloped and out of date.

The U.S. Army Air Forces relied largely on civil airline equipment and personnel to launch the Air Transport Commands intercontinental routes to overseas combat zones. A separate Troop Carrier Command and newly formed airborne divisions hammered out doctrinal concepts and tactical requirements for paratroop engagements. Despite operational shortcomings, subsequent airborne assaults in North Africa and Italy generated a base of knowledge from which to plan such massive aerial formations and paratroop drops as those for the Normandy invasion and Operation Market-Garden, and strategic efforts in the China-Burma-India theater.

Airlift routes over the Himalayas demonstrated one of the wars most effective uses of air transport. The Air Transport Command emerged as a remarkably successful organization with thousands of aircraft and a global network of communications centers, weather forecasting offices, airfields, and maintenance depots, and air-age realities influenced a postwar generation of dedicated military air transports operating around the world.Early Airlift and Airborne Units * Pilots and Airplanes * DC-3/C-47 * C-46 * C-87 * C-54 and C-69 * Helicopters * Gliders * Airborne Operations in the Mediterranean * Special Missions * FRANTIC * CARPETBAGGER and the Balkans * The Assault on Europe * OVERLORD * MARKET-GARDEN * Bastogne and VARSITY * Flying the Hump * Other Far East Missions * Legacies * Suggested ReadingFollowing the entry of the United States into World War I in the spring of 1917, the aviation units in the Signal Corps explored the possibilities of employing aircraft for military transport.

Although the 1916 Pershing Expedition into Mexico occasionally had used airplanes for reconnaissance and to carry mail and dispatches, the equipment available during that operation proved unreliable. In 1918, the Signal Corps supplied airplanes and pilots to inaugurate the first U.S.

airmail service, an operation expected to help train pilots and boost airplane production. This experiment did little for either goal, and the Post Office Department soon took complete control. Overseas, aircraft based in France sometimes carried a single officer or courier, or perhaps priority military dispatches, but the available single-engine, two-place airplanes permitted little else. An effort to assist a force of 500 U.S. soldiers surrounded by the Germans during the Argonne Forest campaign in October 1918 achieved very little.

Remembered as the Lost Battalion, the American unit recovered almost none of the supplies that U.S. airplanes dropped near its position. However, the beleaguered troops surmised the need to mark their location for better identification from the air, and the panels they laid out provided needed information to pinpoint their position and allow relief forces to fight through to them.

The object lesson of aerial marking became standard procedure.



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